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Full text of "Catalogue of Manndale Institute"

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CATALOGUE OF 
Manndale Institute 



THE LIBRARY OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF 

NORTH CAROLINA 

AT CHAPEL HILL 




THE COLLECTION OF 
NORTH CAROLINIANA 



C P 378 
M28H 

1916/17 



CATALOGUE 



MANNDALE INSTITUTE 







THE SCHOLASTIC YEAR 
1916-1917 



POSTOFFICE: 

MANNDALE ALAMANCE COUNTY 

NORTH CAROLINA 



CATALOGUE 



MANNDALE INSTITUTE 

FOR 

THE SCHOLASTIC YEAR 
1916-1917 




A High School For Girls 






POSTOFFICE : 

MANNDALE ALAMANCE COUNTY 
NORTH CAROLINA 



CALENDAR 
1916 




SCHOOL CALENDAR 
FOR THE YEAR 1916-1917. 



September f>, 19 1(1 — Opening of Fall Term. 

September 22 — Applications for diplomas submitted. 

October 23 — Subjects of Senior and Junior Theses sub- 
mitted. 

November (> — Removal of conditions. 

December 1S-22 — Fall Term examinations. 

Decemb r 22 — January 1 — Christmas Holidays. 

January 1, 1917 — Opening of Spring Term. 

January 23 — Last day for removal of conditions by ap- 
plicants for diplomas. 

February 22 — Anniversary of Literary Societies. 

April 12 — Senior and Junior Theses submitted. 

May 14-18 — Spring Term examinations. 

May 19 — Literary Address and Closing Exercises. 

May 20 — Commencement Sermon. 






BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



M. C. McBANE Manndale, N. C. 

Rev. R. B. LINEBERRY .... Colerain, N. C. 

J. W. McBANE Manndale, N. C. 

E. J. BRAXTON Snow Camp, N. C. 

CHARLIE NEWLIN .... Saxapahaw, N. C. 

Rev. W. T. HURST Manndale, N. C. 

J. B. BURKE Evans, N. C. 

W. T. WALTERS Saxapahaw, N. C. 

Rev. R. P. ELLINGTON . . . Saxapahaw, N. C. 

S. M. LEWIS Saxapahaw, N. C. 

WILLIE LINDSEY Roscoe, N. C. 

SHERMAN GLOSSON Manndale, N. C. 



OFFICERS OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

E J. BRAXTON, President, 

Snow Camp, N. C. 

WILLIE LINDSEY, Vice-President, 

Roscoe, N. C. 

M. C. McBANE, Bursar, Sec. and Treas., 

Manndale, N. C. 

S. M. LEWIS, Auditor of Bursar's Books, 

Saxapahaw, N. C. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

CHARLIE NEWLIN, Chairman. 
M. C. McBANE. E. J. BRAXTON. 

WILLIE LINDSEY. W. T. HURST. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

S M. LEWIS, Chairman. Rev. R. P. ELLINGTON. 
M. C. McBANE, J. W. McBANE. 



BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS COMMITTEE. 

SHERMAN GLOSSON, Chairman. 
J. W. McBANE. W, T. HURST. 



FACULTY. 



WILLIAM T, HURST, B. A., Principal. 

Professor of Latin, and Normal Course. 

B. A., Wake Forest College, 1909; Principal of Manndale Institute, 1903- 

1906; Principal of Sandy Creek Baptist Instate, 1906-1907; 

Principal of Sylva Collegiate Institute, 11*09-1911; 

Principal of Manndale. Institute, 1912. 

MRS. W. T. HURST, Lady Principal- 

Professor of Mathematics and Botany. 

Student of Guilford College from 1898-1902; Lady Principal of Manndale 

Institute in 1903-1906; Teacher of Wake Forest Graded School, 

1908-1909; Lady Principal at Sylva Collegiate Institute, 

1909-1911; Lady Principal of Manndale Institute, 1912. 

....^./...&LV.vW.A- 

Professor of Science and English, and Literature. 



Professor of Home Economics. 



Director of Music. 

* 'J.ik Q4. . jZ-^^^rf'V.v^r. ^^.^y^.ifvy^r. 

Primary Department. 

* . /. Li. fJ.LCt. . .-^L^y^Mn.s^ 

Librarian. 



Assistant Librarian. 



OFFICERS OF THE INSTITUTE. 

Rev. W. T. HURST, President. 
Mrs. W. T. HURST, Secretary. 



♦Vacancy yet to be filled. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS. 



GRADUATES OF 1915-'16. 



Braxton, E. A Alamance 

Ulosson, S. C Chatham 

Lewis, Nellie Alamance 

Newliu, J, U Alamance 

UNDERGRADUATES. 

NAME. YEAK OP GRADUATION. COUNTY. 

Andrews, J. R Alamance 

Andrews. Mevotus Aiaiiiauee 

Andrews, Erankie 1U2»J Chatham 

Barton, O Alamance 

Bass, D Alamance 

Braxton, H Chatham 

Buckuer, Matilda 1919 Alamance 

Bnckuer, Louie Alamance 

Buckuer, Agn.s Alaimmce 

Bucknei , Bettie Alamance 

Cheek, Ava 1 ( J17 Alamance 

Clark, B Chatham 

Clark, Venoid Alamance 

Curl, b Alamance 

Durham, J Chatham 

Ellington, H. U Alamance 

Ellington , H Alamance 

Elliugtou, Wiluia Alamance 

Ellington, Paschal Alamance 

Glossou, Emma 1917 Alamance 

Glosson, Nellie 1920 Alamance 

Glosson, Velna Chatham 

Guthrie, Lay ton Alamance 

Hadley, Walker .Alamance 

Hurst, C. VV Wake 

Jo:ies, J Alamance 

Jones, M Alamance 

Jones, Lora Alamance 

Jones, Earl Alamance 



Jones, Lala Alamance 

Jones, W.„ Alamance 

Lewis, M. 13 Alamance 

Lewi-, Gradie Alamance 

Lewis, Delphy Alamance 

Lewis, Doshie Alamance 

Lewis, Zula Alamance 

Lindsey, ii Chatham 

Lloyd, G Orange 

Marley, Georgia Alamance 

McBane, O. D Alamance 

McBaue, Jewel Alamance 

Newliu, Jennie 1917 Alamance 

Norwood, Gertrude 1919 Alamance 

Norwood, Elbert Alamance 

Perry, Annie Belle 1920 Alamance 

Ferry, Bernard , . . . .Alamance 

Perry, M Alamance 

P^rry, Bruce Alamance 

Peri y , Liuuie Alamance 

Perry, Evvie Alamance 

Perry, Diffid Alamance 

Richardson, Howard Alamance 

Rogers, Z Alamance 

Hog rs, Josie Alamance 

Russell, Georgia 1917 Alamance 

Russell, F Alamance 

Thoma-, Mamie 1920 Alamance 

Thomas, Ethel Alamance 

Thomas, Jesse Alamance 

Thomas, Obra Alamance 

Thomas, Ollie... Alamance 

Thomas, Verdie Alamance 

Thomas, Josie.. Alamance 

Thomas, Clady _ Alamance 

Thomas, Myrtle Alamance 

Thomas, Willie Alamance 

Thomas, Vesta _ Alamance 

Thomas, Dixie. Chatham 

Whitfield, L. Orange 

Williams, E.. Chatham 



MUSIC SCHOOL. 

Andrews, Frankie. Chatham 

Buckner, Matilda Alamance 

Buckner, Bettie Alamance 

Cheek, Ava 1920 Alamance 

Glosson, Emma. 1920 Alamance 

Glosson, Velna Chatham 

Lewis, Nettie Alamance 

Newliu, Jennie Alamance 

Perry, Annie Belle Alamance 

Perry, Murphy ; Alamance 

Russell, Georgia 1918 Alamance 

Thomas, Mam e 1918 Alamance 

NIGHT SCHOOL,. 

Buckner, John Alamance 

Buckner, William.. Chatham 

Buckner, Cicero Chatham 

Glosson, Ensley Alamance 

Johnson, Anderson _ Alamance 

Johnson, Margaret Alamance 

Johnsou, Louuie Chatham 

Norwood, George Alamance 

Whitt, Sarah Alamance 

RECAPITULATION BY COUNTIES. 

Alamance 71 

Chatham 14 

Orange ... t 

Wake 1 

88 

RECAPITULATION BY SCHOOLS. 

Latin 15 

English 52 

Political Science 34 

Mathematics 70 

Science 9 

Piano " 12 



MANNDALE INSTITUTE. 



INTRODUCTION 

The founders of Manndale Institute had two ob- 
jects in mind in establishing the institution: to provide 
instruction as extended and thorough as is given a secular 
institution and to aim at the development of the highest 
Christian character among the students. These high 
ideals have been held in view during all these years of 
the school There has been a steady growth and con- 
tinuous improvement in the scope and methods of in- 
struction — courses of study have been added and im- 
proved, and standards of graduation have been used; but, 
amid all of that, it has always been the highest aim of 
the trustees and faculty to maintain Manndale Institute 
as a distinctively Christian institution. 

THE HISTORY. 

Every school has a beginning and a day of small 
things. Likewise Manndale Institute had such a day. 

Let us glance back at its early history and compare it 
with to-day and see the remarkable progress it is making. 

In 1834 Lick Creek Church was organized and a 
house built on a little knoll about 20U yards Southwest 
from the present Mt. Olive Church. This church was 
built of logs and had two divisions — one part was for the 
white people and the other for slaves. 

The first school taught in the neighborhood was 
taught in this church. It was a .subscription school, 
taught by Ruffipai Moore. How long he taught we do 
not know. He was succeeded by John Teriy who was 
succeeded by Allison Roberson. 






10 MANNDALE INSTITUTE 

After a few years the church members decided to 
build a new church nearer the road. They tore down the 
old church, and moved one part of it up near the grave- 
yard in which a blacksmith shop was run by Mr. Glosson. 

Near this shop was erected the new church in which 
they taught school. When cold weather came on the 
teacher and children would go out and build up a fire in 
the old shop so that they might warm their feet and hands. 
There was neither stove nor fireplace in the church. This 
school was carried on under these trying circumstances 
until the other part of the old church was moved about 
half a mile Southeast for a school house. 

It was in this school house where Benton Roberson 
taught his first school. At the end of his school term the 
children asked him to treat them. He said he would not. 
Then they laid hold of him and took him to Lick Branch 
where four big boys held him by legs and arms over the 
stream — saying, "Will you treat us?" They stooi in 
this position several minutes until his brother Thomas 
arrived with the treat. Then said the teacher, "Not 
until you carry me back will I treat you." 

After this Benton Roberson studied medicine, moved 
to Chapel Hill and became a very prominent physician. 
We are proud to learn that so noble a man as Dr. Benton 
Roberson was a student and a teacher at this school. 

Many other families were connected with this school, 
namely: Jean, Johnson, Ellington, Holton, Quakenbush, 
Glosson, Andrews, Perry, Hadley, Russell, Cheek, Love, 
Cook, Lewis, Roberson, Thomas, Flintom and McBane, 
whose children received their early training at this school. 

We are proud to make special note of certain fami- 
lies because of their prominence in the community at that 
time. No kinder men lived in the community than 
Robert Love and David McBane. They were always 
ready to take hold and push forward any movement that 
was for the betterment of their community. They were 
liberal with their means and aided in building churches 
and school houses when called upon. But they lacked 
one thing and that was Christ. They reared and left 
children who are to-day a success both in the financial 



MANNDALE INSTITUTE 11 

and christian world. Old Brother Levi Andrews, who 
was pastor of the church for many years, is of special 
mention because of the good he did and of his influence 
which is still living in our community. And in like man- 
ner we might mention the Flintom and Roberson fami- 
lies, and many others. 

In the year 1870 Mr. S. M. Lindsey began a little 
subscription school in old Mt. Olive Church. This spread 
abroad among the people the desire for a public school, 
and the following autumn they began building a house. 
It was built between the well and where the church now 
stands, or South of the public road. The men hewed the 
logs and made the shingles with which to build it. The 
building had three windows, one door and a large fire- 
place across the east end. However, this was too small, 
and in two or three years an addition of 12 or 14 feet 
and a fireplace was added to the west end. 

The first public school was taught in this house by 
S. M. Lindsey, one of the best teachers of his day, and a 
man whose noble influence is living to-day among men 
and women whom he taught. 

Then following him were Meritt Roberson, A. A. 
Glosson, and S. M. Lewis. We are proud that such men 
have lived before us and for us. But following these 
was a lady teacher, whom we all loved and reverenced, 
not only because she was a teacher, but for the good 
deeds she did and for her life that meant so much for the 
community. This lady was Mrs. Cammie Jones. Then 
among the teachers succeeding her we want to especially 
mention M. C. McBane, not only because he was a good 
teacher, but because he has lived among us ever since and 
lias done much to make Manndale what it is to-day. 

In 1882 the community saw that a better school 
building was needed. To build this, some of the patrons 
thought it best to discontinue the public school for a pe- 
riod of two years and take the free money and build it. 
Of course there were some opposed to this. However, 
knowing of this opposition, M. C. McBane asked all the 
patrons to meet him at the old school house one Sat- 
urday afternoon to decide what should be done. The 



MANNDALE INSTITUTE 12 

appointed evening found present those opposed as well 
as those for it and a tie seemed inevitable. But Mr. 
McBane, who clearly saw all this, but handled it with 
tact asked one of the opposing citizens to, "Lets go to 
ourselves and take a nap of sleep." He gladly consented 
to go, and being very tired soon fell asleep. Now this 
was the very thing Mr. McBane wanted; so while the 
foolish one slumbered and slept, the wise one returned 
and had them vote immediately. Thus by oik.' man's 
mistake and the shrewdness of another the community 
was enabled to build a new school house. 

The new house was a one- roomed, framed house 
situated on the North side of the road in front of where 
the present Manndale High School building now stands. 
It was furnished with home-made desks. 

When it was completed school reopened with Rev. 
T. S. Crutchfield as teacher. We were now having a 
school term of about two or two and one-half months 
and everything went on very nicely till the line between 
Alamance and Chatham counties was established. 
(Remember our school house was then in Chatham). This 
line about evenly divided our school district, but threw 
the house in Alamance. As you can see, this put our 
house on one edge of the district. This gave some little 
trouble as a majority of the patrons wanted to move the 
house north, or to the centr of the district. However, 
this was never done. 

Among the teachers who succeeded Rev. T. S. 
Crutchfield were Mr. Gilmore, Charlie Self, Miss Dora 
Lutterloh, Alex Shaw, Abb Wilson, Lee Mann, Miss 
Mollie Clendenin and Miss Myrtle Morrow. We shall 
always remember each of these for the good instruction 
which they gave. 

In 1903 Prof. W. T. Hurst came to Manndale to 
begin a neighborhood school in this little onf -roomed 
building. At that time the patrons only desired to have 
a school for the benefit of their community. But the 
school grew so rapidly that fall that a three- roomed build- 
ing took the place of the one-roomed building. 

To build this the patrons, with the help of Rev. W. 



MAXNDALE INSTITUTE 13 

S. Long, County Superintendent, borrowed from the 
State $500, and they put in the same amount. Du- 
ring the session Miss Delia Braxton, who had been em- 
ployed by the committeemen as teacher for the public 
school term, assisted Prof. Hurst from early in the fall 
until commencement in the spring. They were very 
congenial, so much so that he asked her to assist him 
through life. She must have consented for they were 
married at commencement in 1904. 

At the close of the first year it was seen that there 
would have to be more preparation made. So there were 
trustees elected and the school named Manndale Institute. 
Prof. W. T. Hurst was elected the first principal, with 
his wife as assistant, and the school of Music was added. 

When the school opened the second year quite a 
number of boarding students presented themselves for 
registration. The neighbors threw open their doors for 
boarders. At the end of three years it was desirous to 
build a dormitory for boarding students but the people 
thought that was too big a task for them to undertake 
So the Principal gave up the school. 

He had had a hard struggle, but he had done a great 
work. He had not only started a high school and helped 
poor boys and girls, but he had implanted in each of his 
pupils' lives something good — ideals that are being suc- 
cessfully developed to-day. 

In 1906 the trustees met and elected Rev. R. B. 
Lineberry Principal of the Institution — a man of fine 
literary culture and powerful christian influence. Under 
his two years' administration the school continued to 
grow. Then the trustees saw it necessary to erect a 
new building for boarding purposes. So the present dor- 
mitory was built. 

In 1908 R. B. Pearson was elected Principal, but 
only served one year. 

So in 1909 0. W. McManus was elected Principal 
and served two years with very successful administra- 
tion. Then he resigned to go to Louisville to prepare 
himself for the ministry. 



14 MANNDALE INSTITUTE 

And Rev. R. P. Ellington, a man of good christian 
influence was elected Principal and served one year. 

In 1912 the prospects for a school were very gloomy 
and it looked as if there would be only a public school 
again. But the trustees, who yet had a little spark of 
hope, met and elected Prof. W. T. Hurst Principal for 
the second time. Now Prof. Hurst did not come back 
here because he thought he would make more money, 
for in coming he gave up a mission field that was pay- 
ing him much more than he could make here; but he 
came, bought land, and has settled down to spend the 
remainder of his life in the interest of this school. 

To-day closes the year 191 5-' 16 very successfully. 
In the past four years the institution has sent out seven- 
teen real graduates. 

During these thirteen years, since the scho >1 became 
a High School, there have gone out from her walls to all 
parts of the country many professional men and women 
whose influence is felt for good. 

During these thirteen years, since the school be- 
came a High School, there have gone out from her walls 
to all parts of the country many professional men and 
women whose influence is felt for good. 

Who can estimate the influence of such an institu- 
tion ? 

BESSIE LEWIS, Historian. 



BUILDINGS and ROAK1). 

We have splendid buildings, equipped with the latest and best iron- 
frame desks, blackboards and pianos, well ventilated, lighted ami heated. 

We also have an excellent building on the campus not more than 30 
feet from the main building, which will furnish rooms for 20 girls. We 
have made arrangements for the girls who room in this building to do their 
own worts — cooking, washing, mending and laundrying, thereby cutting 
down board to actual cost. Any girl, who lives conveniently, may, if 
she wishes, bring her provisions with her from home, which will be 
measured and weighed and entered on a book to her credit, at market 
price. This work will be done under the supervision of a matron who 
will assign to each girl her part of the work to be done. In this way 
we will make it possible for any girl to go to school with very little cost. 



MANNDALE INSTITUTE 15 



At the end of each month all expenses for provisions, wood, etc., will 
be counted up and proportioned out to each girl in their building. If a 
girl misses as many as three meals, by reason of going home on Friday 
afternoon, these will be deducted from her bill at the end of the month. 

LOCATION. 

The location of the school is an admirable one. Manndale is tt beauti- 
ful and healthful place, situated on the public road which leads from 
Pittsboro to Graham. It is a hilly section of the country and a very 
healthy community — 20 miles southeast of Graham, 18 miles northeast of 
Siler City, 12 miles northwest of Pittsboro and 15 miles west of Chapel 
Hill. It has an altitude of about 300 feet, which gives it a cool invigor- 
ating atmosphere. There has never been a death in this school since it 
became a High School. 

OUR AIM 

We aim at thorough work. We give reviews and quizes, and strive 
to make every recitation point to some benefit in life. 

The purpose of the school is to lead the students to cultivate truth- 
fulness, self-control, a right sense of honor, habits of systematic and close 
application in the performance of every duty, and to give them a thor- 
ough preparation for further college work or for the further duties of 
life. To develop in young women all the womanhood possible, and to 
develop such a character and moral power as will give the student a 
power and influence for good, is one of the prime aims of the Manndale 
School. The student needs more than a knowledge of facts — she must 
have the power to use and apply them. She must be thoroughly indoc- 
trinated in principles that she may see the relation of cause to effect and 
of effect to cause, and thus be helped to carve out her career in the world. 

She needs that mental culture and discipline that will give her power 
to do and to act. 

RELIGIOUS INFLUENCE. 

Our school is a Christian School, located in a Christian community. 
Every effort is made to lead the student-body to cultivate a noble 
Christian character. This is done by precept and example. Every day's 
work begins with devotional exercises, which the students are required 
to attend. A well organized Baptist church worships every first Sun- 
day. In connection with the church is a well equipped Sunday School. 
Each student is reqmired to be present at the Sunday mornin services. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

In connection with the school there are two enthusiastic and well or- 
ganized Literary Societies which meet weekly for debate, recitations, 
reading and the transaction of business. The valuable training received 



16 MANNDALE INSTITUTE 



in societies is clearly seen in the exercises at our commencements. We 
consider the work done in these societies, with the advantage of a library, 
to be one of the best means of securing independence of thought, as well 
as correct thinking. 

LIBRARY. 

We have a well selected library of more than 400 volumes. These 
books, together with the principal library of the Sunday School, give the 
students access to more than 800 volumes. Although this is not a large 
number, we have a good selection, and new books are being added from 
time to time. Students have the use of the library free of charge, and 
thus create a taste for reading which is a valuable adjunct to the other 
training. 

A WORD TO THE FRIENDS AND PATRONS OF THE SCHOOL, 

Years of experience and observation have taught us that girls should 
be taught separately, and most especially in^the preparatory school. Hav- 
ing traveled over a goodly portion of North Carolna and having been 
thrown into the homes of so many people I have been made to feel sad 
because of the untrained girl. Thus Mrs. Hurst and myself decided to 
devote our services to lifting up young womanhood in our country. 
With this in view and under the promises of the Trustees of Maundale 
Institute we came back to Manndale to open up such a school, but it 
has taken us four years to convince the people that the girl should be 
educated in a separate school from boys. Therefore Manndale School is 
changed from co-education to female education, and will begin her 14th 
year in th s new phase of work, which we believe to be the greatest mis- 
sion that confronts the people at this day and time. 

There is no period in a girls life so critical as the years between 12 
and 20. It is in those that she is exposed to wrong ideas, wrong concep- 
tions, and a great many times led astray in spite of home training. It 
matters not how carefully her conception of right has been guarded, she 
is usually injudicious in her decisions and must necessarily find her logic 
unreliable. If these years of growth and changes are to leave her fitted 
for womanhood she must devote herself to wholesome thinking, to right 
acting, and to the cultivation of proper ideals. This can best be accom- 
plished in a school for girls exclusively. But this is not the sole reason 
why we stand for the education of girls separately. It is because they 
do not need the same training as boys. Their duties and habits are dif- 
ferent and hence they must be flitted for such. 

Says a New York man : 

"A nation with our problems needs not only a manhood, but a wo- 
manhood, able to see human needs, to feel human aspirations, even in 
humble beginnings, to do human deeds for human kind. This education, 
fitting the girl to go out in life able to see, to feel, to act for her own life 



MANNDALE INSTITUTE 17 

and for others, is to be found only in the private school. The public 
school cannot give it, because there is not time, and because the individ- 
ual child is lost in the mass. To be explicit, such training is to be found, 
generally , only in such private schools as make ideals, and not financial 
success, the chief end." 

This school aims, not merely to graduate girls, but to develop true 
womanhood, to lead young minds to see in life more than mere pleasure, 
more than mere acquisition of knowledge, more than mere industrial or 
commercial success, to lead them to correct principles, to Gospel prin- 
ciples, from which their lives shall in future flow as streams from a life 
giving fountain. 

Christian men and women, this is your institution. Let us have your 
hearty support. 

May God's blessings rest upon the school, its board of Trustees, its pa- 
trons and upon all who shall be entrusted to our care. 

Most sincerely, 

W. T. HURST. 



EXAMINATIONS AND REPORTS. 

Written examinations will be held at the end of each session. No 
student will be promoted without having made .75 per cent, on the same. 

Reports based on recitation and examination records and deportment 
will be sent to parents or guardians. The report will be made as accurate 
as possible, and will show the exact standing of the pupils in each sub- 
ject studied. Parents whose children board at home and come to school 
can greatly aid us in this department by co-operating with their teachers, 
by enforcing home study and regular lesson work. They must see that 
their children obey strictly the regulations of the school, if they want 
them to remain in school at Manndale. 

SPECIAL, NOTICE. 

1. Furnished rooms in the girls' home are rented for $1.00 per month 
— each occupant will pay 50 cts. a month for room, and must be paid at 
end of month. 

2. Students are urged to engage rooms before August 25th. Rooms 
which are engaged will be kept for the occupant; those not engaged will 
be given the first applicant on arrival. 

3. Occupants of the rooms who conduct themselves in such a way 
as to create disorder in the building, and who, by unnecessary noise, in- 
terfere with the comforts of the other occupants, will be required to 
account for such conduct made by them. 

4. Occupants will be held responsible for all damages done to the 
rooms, and if they do not keep them in good order they will be req uired 
to put them in order at once. 



18 MANNDALE INSTITUTE 



5. When are accounts due ? Board promptly at the end of each 
month, tuition at entrance or at the end of the month. 

6. May students visit away from the school ? No student is allowed 
to leave school without the written request of the student's parent or 
guardian. Parents are requested not to ask leave of absence for their 
girls during the session. Absence breaks into the work of the student 
and is demoralizing to the general discipline of the school. The best re- 
sults cannot be obtained from students whose application to studies is in- 
terrupted by absence and the effect of visiting. 

7. Visits from young men will not be permitted. It is supposed 
that girls come to a boarding school for educational purposes, and not to 
have hindrances caused by young men calling. 

8. Relatives and friends should time their visits so as not to conflict 
with the hours of study and recitation. 

9. Girls are not allowed to go walking or shopping unless accom- 
panied by one of the lady teachers. 

10. Each student rooming in the girl's home is requred to bring the 
following articles: 1 Bible, 1 umbrella, overshoes, 1 laundry bag, 4 
towels, 4 table napkins, 1 work bag furnished with needles, thread, thim- 
ble and scissors, toilet soap, comb and brush, and a drinking cup. 

11. Rooms in the girl's home will be furnished with one dresser, 
1 washstand, bowl and pitcher, 1 table, 2 chairs, 1 bedstead and mattress, 
and a heater. 

12. All laundry irticles are required to be plainly marked with the 
name of the owner in indellible ink. 

13. We require neatness and simplicity in dress. 

14. We issue three diplomas: One for the completion of the Literary 
course and one for the completion of the Pianoforte course and one for 
the completion of the course in Home Economics. 

15. There will be no medals given, because of the unsatisfactory 
results. 

16. We have no pets in school. We treat all alike. 
For further information concerning the school, write 

W. T. HURST, Principal 

Manndale, N. C. 



MANNDALE INSTITUTE 19 



COURSE OF STUDY. 



HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 

Instruction is given in the following schools: 

1. Latin Language — 

(1) C. & D.'s Beginner's Latin. 

(2) CaBsar's Gallic Wars. 

(3) icero's Orations. 

(4) Virgil Aeneid. 

2. Greek Language — 

(1) White's Beginner's Greek. 

(2) Xenophon's Anabasis. 

3. Modern Languages — 

(1) White's Brief French Grammar. 

(2) White's Reader and Composition. 

4. English Language — 

(1) English. 

(2) English. 

(3) English. 

(4) English. 

5. Pure Mathematics— 

(1) Algebra. 
fa) Algebra. 
(3) Geometry. 

6. Political Science — 

(1) History. 

(2) History. 

(3) History. 

(4) Political Economy. 

7 . Biology — 

(1) Elementary Physiology. 

(2) Zoology. 

(3) Botany. 

8. Chemistry without Laboratory. 



20 MANNDALE INSTITUTE 



9. Bible— 

(1) Life of Christ. 

(2) Acts. 

10. Teacher Training. 

11. Music. 

12. Home Economics — 

(1) Domestic Science 
l'i) Domestic Arts. 

(3) Household Management. 

(4) Home Decoration. 

1. SCHOOL OF LATIN 

COUESE 1. — Five recitation* a week: Collar and Daniel's 
Beginner's Lai in 

COURSE 2. - Five recitations a week: 4 Books of Caesar's 
Gallic Wars, with Allen and Greeunough's Latin 
Griimmar. 

Course 3. — Five recitations a week: Cicero, Orations wit!; 
Allen and Greennouglfs Latin Grammar, Prose Com- 
position (Arnold's), Systemat c drill in the use of lexi- 
cons. (Harper's Latin-English or White's English- 
Latin). 

COURSE 4 ---Five recitations a week : Virgil Aeneid with 
Allen and Green nough's Latin Grammar, Prose Com- 
position (Arnold's) with systematic drill in the use of 
lexicons. (Harper's Latin-English or White's English- 
Latin). 

2. SCHOOL OF GREEK. 

COURSE 1. — Three recitations a week: White's Beginner's 
Greek. 

COURSE 2 — Three recitations a week: (1) Xenophon's 
Anabasis, Book I, Chaps 1-8; (2) Ana asis, II IV, or 
Books II III of the Anabasis and I Book of Herodotus 

3. SCHOOL OF MODERN LANGUAGES. 

Course 1. — Three recitations a week: Whitney's Brief 
French Grammar, Blouet's French Composition. 

Course 2. — Three recitations a week: Whitney's Reader 
and La Litterateur Francaise Contemporaine. 



MANNDAEE INSTITUTE 21 



4. SCHOOL OF ENGLISH. 

Course 1.— Three recitations a week: Rhetoric (Lock wood 
aud Emerson), with special attention to paragraphing 
and essay wriiiug. 
Grammar — (1 Buehler). 

Reading: Irving's Sketch Book, Hawthorne's House of 
Seven Gables, Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakefield, Long- 
fel low's Evangeline, Scott's Ivanhoe, Bunyan's Pilgrim's 
Progress, Plutarch's Lives of Caesar, etc., and Steven- 
son's Treasure Island. 

Course 2 — Three recitations a week: Rhetoric (Gfnung's), 
a-'d Composition. 
Reading: Sir Roger de Coverly's Papers, George Eliot's 
Silas Marner. Matthew Arnold's Sohrob and Rustuin, 
Tennyson's Princess, Burke's Speech on Conciliation, 
Scott's Lady of the Lake, Coleridge's The Ancient 
Mariner, and Lowell's Vision of Sir Launfal. 

Course 3. — Three recitations a week: English Literature 
(Pancost). 
Reading: Pope's Rape of the Lock, Scott's Kenilworth, 
Macaulay's Life of Samuel Johnson, Macaulay's Essays 
on Milton and Addison, Milton's Paradise Lost, Mil- 
ion's L' Allegro, II Penseroso, Comus aud Lycidas, 
Thackeray's Henry Esmond, and Steveuson's Master of 
Ballautrae; Age of Fables (Bulfiuch), Shakespeare's 
Julius Caesar and Merchant of Venice. 

Course 4. — Three recitations a week: History of English 
Literature (Halleck). 
Reading: Shakespeare's Midsummer Night's Dream, 
Twelfth Night, Macbetn, As You Like It, King Henry 
V, Hamlet, King Lear, Romeo and Juliet, King John, 
and Essays on Addison and Steele. 

5. SCHOOL OF PURE MATHEMATICS. 

Course li — Five recitations a week: Elements of Algebra 
(Wentworth's), as far as Logarithms. 

Course 2 — Five recitations a week: College Algebra 
(Wentworth's), as far as Logarithms, including factor- 
ing, common divisors, fractions, involution and evolu- 
tion, theory of exponents, radicals, quadratics, progres- 
sions, and binomial theorum. 

Course.S. — Five recitations a week: Fall Term — 5 Books 
of Plane Geometry (Wentworth's). 
Spring Term-— 4 Books of Solid Geometry (Wentworth's). 



22 MANNDALE INSTITUTE 



6. SCHOOL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE. 

COURSE 1. — Five resitations a week: Montgomery's English 

History. 
COURSE 2— Three recilations a week: Myer's General 

History. 
COURSE 3. — Three recitations a week: Hart's Essentials of 

American History. 
Course 4 — Two recitations a week: Political Economy. 

7. SCHOOL OF BIOLOGY. 

COURSE 1 — Two recitations a week : Physiology, Martin's 
Human Body. 

COURSE 2. — Two recitations a week: Zoology, Kellogir's 
Animal Forms. 

Course 3. —Two recitations a week : Botany, Bergen's Ele- 
ments of Botany. 

8. SCHOOL OF CHEMISTRY WITHOUT LABORATORY. 

COURSE 1. — Three recitations h week: First Principles of 
Chemistry by Brownlee and others 

9. SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS. 

This department offers to girls a scientific training in 

matters pertaining to the home which is so much needed in 

this day and time. 

COURSE 1. — Domestic Science: This course i eludes a study 
of the principles of cooking and methods of cooking and 
preparing meals. Foods will be studied in detail with 
special reference to their value, cot, and relation to a 
balanced ration. Eaeh student of the class will be re- 
quired to cook and serve a luncheon and a dinner and 
at the same time keep an itemized account of the cost 
of each. 

Cour E 2 — Domestic Arts: This course includes a study 
of the principles of cutting, sewing, and mending. In 
this course students will furnish their own material. 

Course 3 —Household Management: This course includes 
a study of the principles of sanitary science, household 
sanitation, methods of house work, conveniences in the 
home, and the study of materials. 

Course 4. — Home Decoration: This course includes a study 
of the principles of design and decoration tor the home, 



MANNDALE INSTITUTE 23 



house plans aud room plans, saving of space in the 
room, and the development of beauty, harmony and 
simplicity. 

10. COURSE FOR TEACHER TRAINING. 

A number of students come to us every year to make 
special preparation for teaching in the public schools. 

This course presupposes such preparation on thoir part 
that they can complete it in one year. 

Those who can come only in the Spring Term will be 
greatly helped. 

Fall Term. 

Three recitations a week: School Administration — 
Courses of Study, Examinations, Grading Records, 
Incentives, Ventilation, Hy iene, Duties of Superin- 
tendents, of Principals, of Teachers, of School Boards, 
Decoration and Equipment of School Buildings, School 
Laws, the Relation of Municipal, State and National 
Governments to Education. 

Text Books: Seeley's New School Management, Chan- 
cellor's Our Schools, their Administration and Super- 
vision 
English: Essential Studies in English II. 
History: Hill's History of North Carolina, 
Primer of Hygiene 
Arithmetic: Milne's Progressive. 
Political v4eography: Dodge's. 
Drawing for Public Schools. 
North Carolina Education. 

Spring Term. 

English: Buehler Grammar. 

History: (Our Republic) of the United States. 

Primer of Sanitation: Hygiene. 

Political Geography: Dodge's. 

Arithmetic: Milne's Progressive. 

Civil Government: Peele's. 

Drawing for Public Schools. 

How to Tell Stories to Children: Bryant. 

Stories to Tell to Children: Bryant. 

Phonics. 

Busywork. 

North Carolina Education. 



24 MAXXDALE INSTITUTE 



11. SCHOOL OF BIBLE. 

COURSE 1. — Two recitations a week: Study of the Life of 
Christ, Text Book Harmony of the Gospel in Revised 
Version, with notes. 

COURSE 2. — Two recitations a week: Study in Acts of the 
Apostles in Revised Version, with notes. 

12. SCHOOL OF MUSIC. 
Instrumental Music. 

Music is an essential element in the education and cul- 
ture of the young woman. It affords both mental and spir- 
itual refinement. 

Those who wish to pursue courses in higher music 
should study French. 

The, following list of studies indicates the standard of 
work required The outlines Miven will be lollowed in a 
general way. but only such studies and compositions as are 
best adapted to each individual student's requirements will 
be selected for study. 

We caunot fix a definite time for the completion of a 
music course. It depends largely upon natural ability 
and the time devoted to practice. All pupils who finish the 
Pianofoite Course will have io take both History and 
Harmony of Music 

Diplomas will be given those who complete the pre- 
scribed course in music together with a certain amount of 
literary work. 

COURSE 1. 

(A) Exercises for acquiring a correct touch, flexibility, 
and strength of fingers; Formation of intervals; Relation- 
ship of keys; Formation of major scales. 

(B) A clear knowledge of Rhythm, Loeschorn, Op. do, 
Book 1; Kohler's Primary Studies, Op. 5u; Czerny, five finger 
exercises and other Primary studies. Selected Elementary 
pieces. 

COURSE 2. 

Technical exercises. Czerny, Op. 139-129 ; Streabbog Op. 
64, Book 2; Bertivi, Op. 100; Memorizing P J ieces by Clementi, 
Burgmuller, Ilandrock, Hunter, etc. Scales and Arpeggios. 



MANNDALE INSTITUTE 



COURSE 3. 

Scales and Arpeggios; Berens, Op. 61, Booksland 2; 
Loeschorn, Op. 65, Books 1 aud 2; Czerny, Op. 636; Pieces by 
Haydn, Lichner. Merkel, Clementi, Sonatas, Op. 36. Memor- 
izing. 

COURSE 4. 

Czerny. Op. 299, Books 1 and 2; Haseit, Op. 50; Loes- 
chorn, Op 66, Books 1 and 3; Bach's Little Preludes and 
Fugues; Sonatas, Kuhlau; Pieces by Spindler, Dvorak, 
Mozart, etc. 

COURSE 5. 

Scale work in Thirds, Sixths, and Tenths: Deering, Oc- 
tave Studies, Czerny, Op. 299, Books 3 and 4; Bach, Inven- 
tions 2 and 3 part; Sonatas, Haydn, Mozart, and Krause; 
Mendelssohn's Songs W ithout Words ; Pieces by Mendelssohn, 
Rubinstein, Heneelt, Schuett, Handel, etc. 

To be entitled to a diploma in the High School Depart- 
ment the student must have completed the following courses : 
Prescribed (fifty-five hours): — 

Latin 1 „ (5 hrs ) 

Latin 2 (5 hrs.) 

Latin 3 (5 hrs.) 

Latin 4 (5 hrs ) 

English 1 (5 hrs.) 

English 2 (3 hrs.) 

English 3 (3 hrs.) 

Mathematics 1 (5 hrs.) 

Mathematics 2 (5 hrs.) 

Mathematics 3 (5 hrs.) 

History 1 (5 hrs) 

History 2 (3 hrs.) 

Human Physiology 1 (1 hr. ) 

Ten hours elective to be studied from the following : — 

English 4 _ (3 hrs.) 

H : story 3 (5 hrs.) 

Greek 1 and 2 (6 hrs.) 

French 1 and 2 _ (6 hrs.) 

Bible 1 and 2 (4 hrs.) 

Zoology.. (2 hrs ) 

Botany (2 hrs.) 

Chemistry (3 hrs.) 

History 4 ; (2 hrs.) 



26 MANNDALE INSTITUTE 



COURSE OF STUDY 



GRADED DEPARTMENT 

First Grade. 

I. Spelling: 

1. First steps in phonics writing. 

2. Rved's Primary Speller, Part I. 

II. Reading : 

1. The Howell Primer. 

2. Graded Classics I. 

3. Heart of Oak Books I. 
• III. Language : 

1. The oral reproduction of stories. 

2. Copying and dictation. 

3. Other formal work — how to write the children's and their 
parents' name and postoffice addresses; how to write the days of 
the week, and the months of the year; how to write the seasons 
and the names of books used in the class; how to write the titles — 
Mr., Mrs., Miss, Rev., Dr.; and how to write a simple letter, in 
correct form, from dictation. 

I V. Drawing : 

1. Children draw the objects they desire to draw. 

2. Progressive Drawing I. 

V. Arithmetic : 

1. Learning to count (oral). 

2. Learning to read and write numbers 1-1000. 

VI. Physiology: 

The subject is taught altogether orally in this grade. 

VII. Geography: 

1. The first step — conception of the great world beyond. 

a. The teacher reads to the children the stories in Shaw's 
Little People and Big People of Other Lands and the following 
stories from Holbrook's Hiawatha Primer: The Milky Way, p. 
40; The Fire-fly, p. 52; The Moon, p. 64; The Rainbow, p. 74; The 
Owl, p. 80; Hiawatha's Chickens, p. 88; Hiawatha's Brothers, p. 
96; Hiawatha's Hunting, pp. ] 14, 120, 126; The Winds, pp. 127, 
132; Mondamin, pp. 132, 144. 

2. The second step — home geography. 
Elementary ideas of direction, distance, form, color, 



MANNDALE INSTITUTE 27 



Second Grade. 

I. Speliing: 

1. Review of work of First Grade. 

2. Reed's Primary Speller, Part II. 

II. Reading: 

1. Graded Classics II. 

2. Heart of Oak Books II. 

III. Language : 

1. The oral reproduction of stories. 

2. Copying and dictation. 

3. Other formal work — review of the work of First Grade 
and the children practice writing simple letters of their own com- 
position. 

IV. Drawing: 

1. The children continue to draw the object they are interest- 
ed in. They try to illustrate some of the stories read to them 
during the year. 

2. Progressive Drawing II. 

V. Arithmetic : 

1. Reading and writing numbers 1-1000. 

2. The 36 addition facts. 

VI. Physiology 

The subject i s taught altogether orally in this grade. 

VII. Geography: 

Review and continuation of work of First Grade and teacher 
reads to the children Andrew's Seven Little Sisters. 

VIII. Writing: 
Copy-book I. 

TMrd Grade. 

I. Spelling: 

1. Review of work of Second Grade. 

2. Reed's Primary Speller, Part III. 

II. Reading: 

1. Graded Classics 111. 
1. Graded Classics III. 

III. Language : 

i. The oral reproduction of stories. 



28 EANNDALE INSTITUTE 



2. Copying and dictation. 

3. Other formal work — Hyde's Language Lessons I., pp. 1-70, 
to be used by the teacher, but not in the hands of the children. 

IV. Drawing: 

1. The children try to illustrate some of the stories read to 
them by the teacher during the year. 

2. Progressive Drawing III. 

V. History: 

1. Study of Primitive Life. 

2. Observation of National and State Holidays. 

VI. Arithmetic: 

1. Formal addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. 

2. Milne's Progressive Arithmetic, Book I. pp. 73-156. 

VII. Physiology: 
Taught orally. 

VIII. Geography: 

1. First step — conception of the great world beyond. 

a. Teacher reads to the children Little Lucy's Wonderful 
Globe. 

b. Teacher and children locate on a large map or globe North 
America and the other continents, the oceans, the United States, 
North Carolina, some of the cities and countries of which they 
have heard, their own county and the nearest-by towns. 

2. Second step — home geography. 

a. Elementary ideas of direction, distance, color, form. 

b. Local occupations, local land and water forms. 

IX. Writing: 
Copy-book II. 

Fourth Grade. 

I. Spelling: 

1. Review of the work of Third Grade. 

2. Reed's Word Lessons. 

II. Reading: 

1. Fourth Language Reader. 

2. Heart of Oak Books, IV. 

III. Language: 

'. The oral reproduction of stores. 

2. Copying and dictation. 

3. Other formal work — Hyde's Language Lessons I, pp. 70- 
158, in hands of the children. 



MANNDALE INSTITUTE 29 



IV. Drawing : 

1. The children try to illustrate some of the stories read to 
them during the year. 

2. Progressive Drawing IV. 

V. History: 

1. Local History. 

2. Discoverers and explorers. 

3. Stories from other Nations. 

VI. Arithmetic : 

1. Review of previous year. 

2. Long Division. 

3. Common Fractions. 

Milne's Progressive Arithmetic, Book I, pp. 157-282. 

VII. Physiology: 

Ritchie — Caldwell Primer of Hygiene. 

VIII. Geography: 

1. Home Geography and World Relation; Dodge's Primary 
Geography, pp. 1-71. First half-year. 

2. Elements of Continental Geography — North America, pp. 
71-130. Second half-year. 

IX. Writing: 
Copy-book III. 

Fifth Grade. 

I. Spelling: 

1. Review work of previous grade. 

2. Reed's Word Lessons. 

li. Reading: 

1. Fifth Language Reader. 

2. Heart of Oak Books V. 

3. Conner's Makers of North Carolina History. 

4. Song of Hiawatha. 

5. Francillon's Gods and Heroes. 
III. Language: 

',. The oral reproduction of sto.ie*. 

2. Copying and dictation. 

3. Other formal work — Hyde's Language Lessons, pp. 158 to 
the end of the book. 



30 MANNDALE INSTITUTE 



IV. Drawing : 

1. Progressive Drawing V. 

2. The children do considerable work in drawing outside of 
the work by the book, as an aid to the work in geography, agri- 
culture, etc. 

V. History: 

1. White's Beginners U. S. History, completed. 

2. Spanish and Portuguese Stoiies, English History, Stories 
of other European countries. 

VI. Arithmetic: 

1. Review work of Fourth Grade. 

2. Continue study of Common Fractions. 

3. Study Decimals, completing Milne's Progressive Arith- 
metic, Book I. Take up Book II. 

VII. Physiology: 

Ritchie — Caldwell Primer of Hygiene. 

VIII. Geography: 

Dodge's Elementary Geography, pp. 131-217. 

IX. Writing: 
Copy-book IV. 

Sixth Grade. 

I. Spelling: 

1. Review of the work of the preceding year. 

2. Reed's Word Lessons. 

II. Reading: 

1. Heart of Oak Books VI. 

2. Hawthorne's Great Stone Face. 

3. Brown' s In the Days of the Giants. 

4. Guerber's Story of the Greeks. 

III. Language: 

1. The oral reproduction of stories. 

2. Copying and dictation. 

4. Other formal work — Essential Studies in English II. 

IV. Drawing: 

1. Progressive Drawing VI. 

2. The children do considerable work in drawing as an aid 
in the work in Geography, history, etc. 

V. History: 

Our Republic, completed. 



MANNDALE INSTITUTE 31 



VI. Arithmetic: 

1. Review of work of previous year. 

2. Percentage and its applications. 

3. Milne's Progressive Arithmetic, Book II, completed. 

VII. Physiology: 

Ritchie's Primer of Sanitation. 

VIII. Geography: 

Dodge's Comparative Geography, pp. 88-200. 

IX. Agriculture: 
Agriculture for Beginners. 

X. Writing: 
Copy-books V and VI. 

Seventh Grade. 

I. Spelling: 

1. Review work of previous years. 

2. Reed's Word Lessons. 

II. Reading: 

1. Heart of Oak Books VII. 

2. Brooks' Story of Cotton. 

3. Irving's Rip Van Winkle. 

4. Warren's Stories from English History. 

III. Language: 

1. The oral reproduction of stories. 

2 . (. c pying and dictation. 

3. Other formal work — Essential Studies in English II, com- 
pleted. 

IV. Drawing: 

1. Progressive Drawing VII. 

2. The children do considerable work in drawing as an aid to 
the work in agriculture, history, etc. 

V. History: 

1. Hill's Carolina History, completed. 

2. Peele's Civil Government. 

VI. Arithmetic: 

1. Review work of previous year. 

2. Milne's Progressive Arithmetic, Book III, completed. 



32 MANNDALE INSTITUTE 



VII. Physiology: 

Ritchie's Primer of Sanitation. 

VIII. Geography: 

Dodge's Comparative Geography, completed. 



#«-#♦ 



M. H. S. ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 



The objects of this Association are to preserve and quick* n 
the interest of the members in their Alma Mater, to suggest im- 
provements, to diccuss educational problems, to record the pro- 
gress, and to preserve the history and influence of the institution 
as illustrated in the lives of the individual Alumni Any former 
student of the institution is eligible to membership. 

The 3rd annual meet was held at the institution on Saturday 
of the Commencement, and will meet every year on Commence- 
ment day at such an hour as shall be chosen by the committee. 

The officers of the Association of 1915-1916, were: 

Mr. E. L. Russell, President, Saxapahaw, N. C. 

Miss _ Bessie Lewis, Secretary, Saxapahaw, N. C. 

Mr. M. C. McBane, Treasurer, Manndale, N. C. 



MANNDALE INSTITUTE 



33 



SCHOOL EXPENSES. 



Graded Department. 

PER PER 

MONTH YEAR 

First Grade $1.00 $ 9.00 

Second Grade 1.20 10.80 

Third Grade 1.40 12.60 

Fourth Grade 1.60 14.40 

Fifth Grade 1.75 15.75 

Sixth Grade 1.90 17.10 

Seventh Grade 2.05 18.45 

High School Department. 

Freshman Year ' $3.00 $27.00 

Sophomore Year 3.00 27.00 

Junior Year 3.00 27.00 

Senior Year 3.00 27.00 

Music Department. 

Intsrumental Music $2.50 $22.50 

Chorus Singing FREE 

Department of Education. 

Teacher Training Course $3.00 $27.00 

DeDartment of Economics. 

Home Economics $2.50 $22.50 

Board. 

Board in private homes including fuel and lights $9.50 $85.50 

Washing and laundry 50 4.50 

Room rent in girls home 50 4.50 

Board in girls home at cost $ . . . $ . . . 

Extras. 

Extra use of piano for practice (outside the regular lesson) 
one school hour per day, 50 cents per month. 

History and Harmony of Music, each 50 cents per month. 

Incidental Fee term, 50 cents. 

Diploma Fee, $2.50. 

No deduction from the above rates will be made except in 
protracted sickness, for not less than two weeks. 



34 MANNDALE INSTITUTE 



COMMENCEMENT 1916 

PROGRAM 
MAY 12TH, 13TH AND 14TH. 



Friday Night May 12, 1916. 

7:00 p. m. — Musical Concert. 
. . 1 — Chorus — May Pole Dance. 

2 — Duet — Westward Ho — Wilson, Georgia Russell and Matilda 

Buckner. 
3 — Duet — In The Arena — Engleman, Annie Belle Perry and 

Nettie Lewis. 
4 — Solo — Love's Token — Klickman, Emma Glosson. 
5 — Quartette — Lift Up Thine Eyes. 
6 — Duet — Calvary Parade — Parker, Georgia Russell and Ava 

Cheek. 
7 — Duet — By the Fireside — Fearis, Matilda Buckner and 

Frankie Andrews. 
8 — Duet — Playing Tag— Beulah Andrews and Bettie Buckner 
9 — Duet — Uncter The Mistletoe — Engleman, Beulah Andrew:. 

and Jennie Newlin. 
10 — Solo — Valse Caprice — Eyer, Ava Cheek. 
Play — Everygirl. 

Saturday Morning, May 13. 

10:00 a. m.— Song. 

Prayer. 

Chorus — Awake with the Lark. 
13:30 a. m.— Literary Address by Dr. John Jeter Hurt, Durham, 
N. C. 



MANNDALE INSTITUTE 35 



Piano Solo — Fifth Nocturne — Leybach, Mamie I. Thomas. 
11:30 a. rn. — Orations by representatives of Graduating Class: — 
Nettie Lewis, Ath.— Life Is What We Make It 
Spurgeon C. Glosson, Phi. — Opportunity. 
Everette A. Braxton, Eu. — Two Measures The Farmer should 

Support. 
Duet — Joyous Return — Ringuet, Mamie Thomas and Emma 
Glosson. 
. .80 p. m. — Dinner. 

Saturday Afternoon. 

2:00 p. m. — Chorus. 
Class Hour. — 

J. Curtis Newlin, President. 
Nettie Lewis, Secretary. 
Spurgeon C. Glosson, Treasurer. 
3:00 p. m. — Diplomas Awarded. 

3:15 p. m. — Address by the Principal to the class of 1916. 
3:30 p. m. — Reunion of Alumni. 

Piano Solo — Humoreske — Dvorak, Nettie Lewis. 
4:15 p. m. — Debate: — 

Erne s t Williams, President, Teer, N. C. 
Harvey D. Ellington, Secretary, Saxapahaw, N. C. 
Query — Resolved: That North Carolina Should Permit Rural 
Communities to Adopt Race Segregation in Land Ownership. 
Affirmative. Negative 

S. C. Glosson, Phi. M. B. Lewis, Eu. 

O. D. McBane, Eu. W. T. Johnson, Phi. 

Piano Solo — Oberon — Leybach, Georgia Russell. 
Supper. 

Saturday Night. 

6:30 p. m. — Annual Concert: 

Trio — Last night. 
Recitation: 

Nellie Glosson — What is a hedgehog. 

Frankie Andrews — A Legend of Vermont. 

Matilda Buckner — Jamie Butler and the Owl. 

Gertrude Norwood — The Polish Boy. 

Mamie Thomas — The Fireman. 
Nobody's Child — 5 characters. 
Drill— The Vestal Virgins — 9 characters. 



36 MANNDALE INSTITUTE 



A Farce — $10,000 Wager — 7 characters. 
Drama — Hazel Adams — 8 characters. 
Chorus — Picaninny Lullaby. 

Sunday Morning, May 14. 

10: a. m. — Song. 

Invocation. 

Scripture Reading. 

Prayer. 

Song. 
11:00 a. m. — Annual Sermon by Rev. Martin W. Buck, Burlington, 
N. C. 

MARSHALS. 

Clarence Curl, Eu., Chief. 
Marvin Jones, Phi. Gradie Lewis, Eu. 



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